Creativity at Work.TM

Hello! Welcome to a visionary agency where we define brand personality and build brand equity.

Founded in 2002

Born and Raised in Miami

Independent & Minority Owned

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What We Do?

Imagery is a creative team

specializing in brand development for consumer products and services.

Our love for design far exceeds beautiful imagery. Good branding needs to be relevant and we solve problems by positioning brands with meaningful and memorable stories.

Creative
Ideas

We think, design and live in colors to make things better.

Digital
Innovation

We make you stand apart with technology and applications for any online platform.

Brand
Communication

We execute advertising and branding strategies on a global scale.

A Snow Date

Not even a blizzard can hold back young love. A great new spot for the season that will make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside. A young boy has a date planned and is ready to go, despite his father’s concerns about the ongoing snowstorm making the road conditions perilous. The ad features the song “Make You Feel My Love” by Sleeping At Last.

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CommonWealth

Developing a unique brand with old school charm for a Restaurant / Whiskey Bar concept is quite the challenge. Although the concept was just born, Imagery set out to create an identity rooted in a vintage style (speakeasy) with an era appropriate typeface and crafty elements that set the vibe for patrons before even setting foot in the door.

Forever Crystals

How do you create consumer appeal for an up and coming international company passionate about their jewelry products? You go through a professional rebranding process.

Imagery’s objective was to update the Forever Crystals brand by designing a contemporary identity system that visually identifies with their history and connects with their core mission. We wanted the new brand to be approachable, to garner mass-market interest, driving traffic online or through its retail locations.

It’s a Home Run!

17 Marketing Trends To Watch Out For In 2017

End of the year is the time of year when every strategist should be taking a step away from the day-to-day and giving a good hard look at the past year’s performance. After all, if you’re not paying attention to what has worked (or hasn’t worked) over the past 12 months, how are you going to know what to adjust in the months to come?

For 2017, here are 17 trends you should be paying attention to.

1. Interactive Content

There’s content you can read, and then there’s content you can interact with. The second variety tends to be more popular. For example, BuzzFeed’s “Which City Should You Live In?” quiz has been one of their home-run pieces. Think of ways to get readers to actively participate instead of passively consume. Interactive content can include assessments (such as the classic Cosmo Quiz setup), polls, surveys, infographics, brackets and contests.

2. Influencer Marketing

What’s more effective than an ad in selling your product? A lovable social media personality speaking highly about your product to his or her fans and followers. Influencer marketing is on the rise, because people tend to trust recommendations from people they see as thought leaders. The right influencers establish credibility through each social media post or advertisement. When they work with brands, it’s because they genuinely believe in them, and that trust is passed on to consumers.

3. Mobile Video

Have you looked at your Facebook feed recently? Chances are that 95% of it is video. And here’s a fun stat: mobile video views grew six times faster than desktop views in 2015. In fact, in Q4 of 2015, mobile video views exceeded desktop views for the first time ever. We now live in an age of mobile video, and it’s time we embraced it.

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Baptist Health Foundation

Healthcare is a challenging, yet rewarding field. Unfortunately, it’s also very costly. In an effort to offset these costs, The Baptist Health Foundation launched a philanthropic initiative through the purchase of personalized Bricks which memorializes donations made by those inspired to help. Imagery was commissioned to developed this ad campaign to help fund the new development of the Baptist Health Foundation and its mission to eradicate cancer. Our creative approach showcases the love and compassion that each brick exudes and how each donation is personal and most importantly, appreciated. We feel these ads lay the foundation to a philanthropic mission that is strong and deeply rooted in improving everyone’s life it touches.

Waterprofit

Every once in a while someone comes up with a new product with the potential to change an industry and people’s lives. In this case, the client approached Imagery with branding requirements for a new device that can save consumers an average of 40% monthly on their water bills. That is significant savings not just for residential markets but also for commercial applications.

Excited to launch the new product, Imagery immediately went to work developing a unique brand that encompasses the product’s features and value proposition. Imagery was tasked with the naming exercise, brand identity, marketing communications, brand packaging and website design and development. Although still in the works, everyone loves the creative progress and the prospective for Waterprofit once it hits the general market in 2017.

A Test of Blind Ambition

The experiences of blind Paralympian Libby Clegg growing up have inspired the new campaign for Guide Dogs.

The work offers soundbites based on events from Libby’s life, including being bullied, changing schools and discovering her talent for running, despite others insisting she should not attempt it.

This is a very powerful ad, that makes you focus on sound for sight and allows your imagination to take over.

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Advertising is complicated and difficult to explain

My wife and I recently had dinner with my 8-year-old son and his friend. We asked my son’s friend what his parents do for a living, and he knew—I mean, he really knew.

He not only told us his dad is a surgeon, but what kind of surgeon, the surgeries he performs, and the instruments he uses during his procedures. Our jaws went slack. This kid not only understood his father’s trade but also how to explain it clearly and articulately to others.

I turned to my son and said, “Do you know what daddy does?”

He answered confidently: “advertising.”

I smiled at my wife as if our little boy just completed a tumbling double-half layout, complete with a full twist. I looked back at our son and said, “Go on…” but that’s where his knowledge ended.

He looked down, then back up at me sheepishly and mumbled the words, “Something to do with TV and the Internet?”

That’s as good as a lot of us could do. Advertising is more complicated than ever before and thus quite difficult to explain to our clients, let alone to an 8-year-old. That’s when I told him this story:

This summer, I meandered into a shop in Montauk. The owner was in the back of the store making jewelry in front of a glass case full of silver ornaments and charms she created. Each was meant to dangle from a necklace or bracelet.

I don’t wear any jewelry beyond my wedding ring and a durable plastic watch but I recently had a birthday and found myself interested in buying something meaningful to wear around my neck and close to my heart. I looked at dog tags, sailing anchors, hearts, coins, bullets, tusks, locks and lockets, but none appealed to me. Each charm represented something different but none of them told my story.

I kept coming back to a small silver ring in the glass case. There wasn’t anything ornate about it but it was beautiful—simple and raw. I’m not sure why I was drawn to it but I couldn’t take my eyes off it.

I finally asked the shop owner to tell me the story of the ring. She looked at me, head half cocked, and said, “Story?”

I said, “What does it mean?”

“Oh…” she said, “Nothing—it’s a ring.”

I told her I really liked the ring but I can’t hang something devoid of meaning around my neck and close to my heart. It needed a story, some significance.

She said, “I’m not sure what to tell you.”

Dejected, I began to walk towards the door, when she said, “Wait…rings are symbols of the circle of life, of the connections we make and keep with us.”

Without hesitation, I pivoted in her direction and said, “Yes…perfect…the circle of life…yes! How much do I owe you?” That was something I could put around my neck. Now, when I looked at this ring, I instantly thought of my wife and children, my parents, and my brother. In a fraction of a second, this small piece of silver symbolized the single most important aspect of my life —my family.

You see, in advertising, we’re in the business of telling stories, uncovering meaning and infusing symbolism where none exists. Often times, our job is writing the backstory, the mythology, and helping people connect with brands, products, causes and issues in ways they never envisioned.

My son looked at the ring around my neck. I wondered if the friend would go back home and say, “I have no idea what his dad does for a living.”

“You got it?” I said.

My son nodded. “Yep, and I think I want to be a surgeon.”

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The Future of Social Media Marketing: Social Media Predictions for 2017

Social media platforms enable people from around the world looking to connect and build personal and professional relationships. Earlier this year studies found that there are currently over 2 billion active social media users.

If you consider the sheer number of people interacting on social networks, it seems like a no-brainer that both B2C and B2B brands should be spending time engaging with their audience, where they’re spending time. But finding a way to not only reach, but connect with audiences on social networks has become increasingly difficult.

Just a couple years ago, brands were able to build audiences on platforms like Facebook and get in front of the vast majority of their followers without investing in social advertising. These days, the average brand on Facebook will only reach 1-2% of their audience without boosting posts. Need proof? The amount spent on social advertising has increased by 234% in the past seven years. Ouch!

To help ease the pain, we went straight to the source and tapped into the brilliant minds of marketers from brands like LinkedIn, Social Media Examiner, Social Media Today, BMC and our own team at TopRank Marketing to gain insights into their social media marketing predictions for 2017.

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Robinsons’ baby grows up in 60 secs

One of the freakiest but fun ads published this year gives true meaning to the circle of life:
We open on a mom, dad and baby boy. But within seconds, he’s always getting bigger and bigger, and trying to run away from them.

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